Archive for the ‘W’ Category

Web 2.0

October 13, 2007

Web 2.0 commonly refers to the second generation of web development and usage.

Rather than the web being simply a tool to provide information to the user, or to sell products and services online, Web 2.0 uses the web as a collaborative and participatory tool in itself.

The growth in social networking sites such as Facebook, Bebo and MySpace; the explosion of user-generated (and user-managed) websites such as Wikipedia; and the upsurge in niche and vertical sites rather than broad content sites; are all part of Web 2.0.

By Sarah at UK Broadband Finder
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Webcam

October 6, 2007

A webcam is a camera, often low-resolution, that is linked to your computer. It can be built in, or added as an attachment. Realtime images from the camera can then be transmitted to other users via a broadband connection.

Webcams are often used for video instant messaging, and for security purposes (a webcam can be left running in an empty property and the pictures transmitted to the work pc of the home owner, for example).

By Sarah at UK Broadband Finder
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Wireless Fidelity – WiFi

October 6, 2007

Strictly speaking wireless fidelity, usually shortened to WiFi, refers to the wireless standard IEEE 802.11.

WiFi is used to create wireless networks which use radio transmissions over short distances to create connections between devices without wires or cables.

By Sarah at UK Broadband Finder
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Wireless Protected Access – WPA

August 21, 2007

WPA, or wireless protected access, is a standard for wifi. It is more secure than the previous standard, WEP (wired equivalent privacy) and was developed as a response to some of the security weaknesses in WEP which were making WEP unsuitable for corporations.

WPA boasts improved authentication and encryption and should work with all wireless network interface cards.

By Sarah at UK Broadband Finder
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WAN – Wide Area Network

August 6, 2007

A WAN, or Wide Area Network, is a network made of up of Local Area Networks (LANs) that are apart geographically. They can be business-owned – for example, a business that has many offices may link its LANs via a WAN using the public phone system, leased lines, or other methods.

However WANs are often public shared-user networks – for example, the biggest WAN is the internet.

By Sarah at UK Broadband Finder
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Wireless Bridge

July 11, 2007

A wireless bridge may be used to connect parts of a network, for example two office buildings next to each other. They work using either infrared or microwave transmission and are cheaper than linking with cable. Some wireless bridges need to have a sightline between the two points in order to operate.

By Sarah at UK Broadband Finder
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WAP – Wireless Application Protocol

July 3, 2007

WAP, or wireless application protocol, standardises the way in which you can get online via your mobile phone or other small wireless device. It was developed by Phone.com, Ericsson, Nokia, and Motorola to allow transmission of data within the likely constraints of a small wireless device (small screen size, low bandwidth, short memory).

By Sarah at UK Broadband Finder
Read my Broadband Glossary disclaimer

Web Browser

June 28, 2007

Web browsers allow you to look at and interact with the World Wide Web (or, if not in a WW setting, with a particular set of documents and pages). Popular web browsers include Internet Explorer, Netscape, Firefox and Opera.

A web browser displays webpages by communicating with the web server where the requested webpage is held. It then serve up the page, and the coding on the page (usually html) indicates to the browser how the page should be displayed (eg, that a section is bold, or that a particular phrase is the page’s title).

Code for hyperlinks within the page and displayed by the browser make it possible for a user to jump from one page to another, or one website to another, without following a set, linear path.

A page viewed on one web browser could look different on another browser,  due to the way the browser software interprets the coding behind the text (non-standard html code may be interpreted incorrectly by some browsers).

By Sarah at UK Broadband Finder
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Copper Wires / Copper Cable

June 20, 2007

Data – whether voice or broadband data – is carried on your phone lines over twisted pair copper wires. Copper has been a standard for data transfer for many years.

Increasingly fibre-optical cable is being laid (cable TV and broadband run over fibre-optic cables), which can data carry services such as TV and broadband at much higher speeds. However there is so much copper wire around (most residential phone cables are copper wire) that it will continue as a standard for some time to come.

By Sarah at UK Broadband Finder
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WWW the World Wide Web

June 11, 2007

The World Wide Web is part of the internet, but is not syonymous with it.

The internet predates the World Wide Web. The World Wide Web was invented by Tim Berners-Lee in 1989 when he was working at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN). He has called the internet “a network of networks” and the World Wide Web ” an abstract (imaginary) space of information”. (See more on his FAQs at www.w3.org, the World Wide Web Consortium which works wih organisations and the public to develop Web standards).

Some people prefer to say that WWW is made up of all internet resources using hypertext transfer protocol, otherwise known as http (which you will see at the front of a www address). The main document formatting language used on the Web is HyperText Mark-up Language, or html – it is thanks to html that you can jump from webage to webpage using hyperlinks.

By Sarah at UK Broadband Finder
Read my Broadband Glossary disclaimer