Archive for the ‘P’ Category

Project Kangaroo

November 2, 2008

Project Kangaroo is the working title of a video-on-demand (VoD) service to be provided by a consortium made up of ITV, Channel 4 and BBC Worldwide.

Content available will include recent and classic TV programmes and serials. There will be a catch-up TV service for recently aired programmes. Other content will be available free (paid for by advertising on the service) or pay-for.

It is expected that other broadcasters and content owners will be asked to join the service at a later date.

By Sarah at UK Broadband Finder
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Podcast

October 29, 2007

A podcast is a digital file – usually audio – that is pre-recorded and offered for download from the internet. Podcasts are commonly distributed around the web via RSS feeds. Users can then download podcasts to computers or MP3 players to listen to when they want.

Popular podcast content includes radio shows, interviews, and concerts. They can be one-offs or part of a series. Some are simply established shows recorded in a podcast format, while others are created specially and solely as podcasts.

The name podcast comes from broadcast and iPod – however podcasts can be played on non-Apple hardware.

By Sarah at UK Broadband Finder
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Pop-up and Pop-under

September 26, 2007

A pop-up is a small window that appears in front of your open browser. It may include advertising from a website, or it may hold website information such as a small help screen. Pop-ups can be intrusive (particularly advertising pop-ups) but they can be blocked using software.

A pop-under appears behind your open browser window, so you may not notice it is there until you close your browser. Pop-unders can be useful to promote tasks that you cannot undertake until you have finished a journey through a particular website, such as a post-sale survey.

By Sarah at UK Broadband Finder
Read my Broadband Glossary disclaimer

Proxy Server

September 6, 2007

A proxy server sits between the user’s computer and the internet. It holds requests from users for a length of time and can be used in several situations, including:

Caching. A proxy server can store pages that you, or other people in your organisation, have already viewed on the web. This is called caching and it means that when you try to view a page that has been viewed previously, it can be retrieved from the cache on the proxy server not from the website it is actually from (which would take longer). In a large organisation with many web users this can significantly improve web performance.

Blocking. A proxy server can also be used for administration purposes, for example to prevent users from visiting specific websites.

Anonymising. Some web users use a proxy server to enable them to browse the web anonymously.

The average user will be unaware that their requests are going through a proxy server – a webpage will still look as if it has come from the actual website, with the website URL.

By Sarah at UK Broadband Finder
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Ping

August 30, 2007

On the internet, a ping involves sending a packet of data to an internet address. The destination server responds to the ping, demonstrating that it exists and is connected to the network. The speed of its response also assists the sending computer identify speed problems and therefore determine which is the most effective route for its traffic.

In blogging, blog software can be set up to automatically ping other servers when the blog is updated (so blog search engines and aggregators can offer frequently updated blog content).

By Sarah at UK Broadband Finder
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Proprietary Software

August 21, 2007

Proprietary software is software that is offered for use under licence to consumers or businesses – however, crucially the licensee is not able to adapt or (in most cases) see the software source code.

Ensuring this can be done using legal and/or technological methods.

By Sarah at UK Broadband Finder
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Peer to Peer – P2P

August 17, 2007

Peer to peer, or P2P, involves two or more computers communicating with each other without a central server in between. Peer to peer is often referred to in the context of music file sharing (such as MP3s) between computer users. However it is also useful for business as it has particular benefits – for example, P2P can use the combined bandwidth of the computers involved, and it is not reliant on a central server (which could fail).

By Sarah at UK Broadband Finder
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PBX – Private Branch Exchange

August 6, 2007

A PBX, or private branch exchange, allows users within a business to share outgoing phone lines, rather than having the expense of paying for an outside line for each phone extension. It also manages calls within the exchange. Some PBX systems can handle outgoing data lines as well as phone lines.

By Sarah at UK Broadband Finder
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Pop3

July 18, 2007

POP3, or Post Office Protocol version 3, is a standard for retrieving email from a message mailbox on an email server, to your computer. Because the email message actually downloads to your machine you don’t need to stay online to read the message – making it particularly useful to people with dial up connections. Many ISP email accounts (ie not web mail) use Pop3.

If you have a Pop3 email account and you own a domain name you can have an email address such as yourname@yourdomain.com

By Sarah at UK Broadband Finder
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Port

June 27, 2007

There are three types of port in the computer / internet world:

  • A port is a physical access point for a computer – a small socket that acts as an interface for a link (such as a cable) to another device such as a mouse.
  • A port can also be virtual – it is represented by a number (the number 80 identifies webpage traffic) and points packets (small amounts of data) to the correct network application.
  • You can port an application or software to another computer – this will involve rewriting some of the code so it works on the new computer.

By Sarah at UK Broadband Finder
Read my Broadband Glossary disclaimer