Archive for the ‘B’ Category

Backbone

November 10, 2007

A backbone is a robust central transmission line (or a collection of transmission lines) that links many smaller local networks via connections known network access points.

It can be a local backbone for a group of office buildings or local area, linking smaller networks to create a wide area network (WAN); or the internet backbone itself, which is made up of superfast, high bandwidth lines (which may be commercial or governmental) that link smaller networks to the internet.

Large ISPs may connect to the internet backbone directly, though smaller ISPs may link to another larger ISP which then links to the backbone.

The fewer links there are between your internet connection and the backbone, the faster your internet connection will be.

By Sarah at UK Broadband Finder
Read my Broadband Glossary disclaimer

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Blog

October 29, 2007

A blog, or weblog, is a type of online diary that can be easily updated. An article on a blog is called a post, and will be dated. Blogs usually have comments sections allowing interaction and debate between the blogger and the audience. Blogs will often link to other blogs, creating an online world of blogs called the blogosphere.

Blogs offer a powerful opportunity for individuals, small businesses and organisations to have a visible voice despite their small size – through interesting posts that are linked to by other blogs, or disseminated across the web via RSS feeds.

Blogging software may be pay-for or free to use. Blogs are usually hosted by third parties – popular blogging sites include  Typepad, Blogger and WordPress.

By Sarah at UK Broadband Finder
Read my Broadband Glossary disclaimer

BT HomeHub

October 6, 2007

The HomeHub is a wireless router supplied by BT. It is currently free to those subscribing to BT Total Broadband Option 2 or 3, and costs £30 for those with BT Total Broadband Option 1.

The BT HomeHub allows users connect multiple devices, either with or without wires. It includes a firewall, updates itself automatically, and can be connected to a touchphone, allowing users to make voice over IP (VoIP) calls via the internet.

By Sarah at UK Broadband Finder
Read my Broadband Glossary disclaimer

Broadband ISDN

September 13, 2007

Broadband ISDN takes ISDN a step further. Whereas ISDN is transmitted over the the copper wire narrowband loop, broadband ISDN (or B-ISDN) uses fibre. This means it can send and receive data (including voice, data and video) at over 150Mb.

By Sarah at UK Broadband Finder
Read my Broadband Glossary disclaimer

Wireless Bridge

July 11, 2007

A wireless bridge may be used to connect parts of a network, for example two office buildings next to each other. They work using either infrared or microwave transmission and are cheaper than linking with cable. Some wireless bridges need to have a sightline between the two points in order to operate.

By Sarah at UK Broadband Finder
Read my Broadband Glossary disclaimer

Bluetooth

July 9, 2007

Bluetooth is a short range wireless standard developed by Ericsson, IBM, Intel, Nokia and Toshiba to allow portable personal wireless devices to communicate with each other by radio.

Devices such as mobile phones, PDAs and computer mice often use Bluetooth.

Bluetooth-enabled devices simply need to be within range of each other – they do not need to be linked with cables. You can then synchronise information between two devices, print from a pc to wireless printer, etc.

By Sarah at UK Broadband Finder
Read my Broadband Glossary disclaimer

Web Browser

June 28, 2007

Web browsers allow you to look at and interact with the World Wide Web (or, if not in a WW setting, with a particular set of documents and pages). Popular web browsers include Internet Explorer, Netscape, Firefox and Opera.

A web browser displays webpages by communicating with the web server where the requested webpage is held. It then serve up the page, and the coding on the page (usually html) indicates to the browser how the page should be displayed (eg, that a section is bold, or that a particular phrase is the page’s title).

Code for hyperlinks within the page and displayed by the browser make it possible for a user to jump from one page to another, or one website to another, without following a set, linear path.

A page viewed on one web browser could look different on another browser,  due to the way the browser software interprets the coding behind the text (non-standard html code may be interpreted incorrectly by some browsers).

By Sarah at UK Broadband Finder
Read my Broadband Glossary disclaimer

Mac Compatible Broadband

June 18, 2007

Most UK broadband packages are Apple Mac-compatible. However not every provider offers the same level of support to someone using Mac-friendly broadband hardware as they do to pc users.

By Sarah at UK Broadband Finder
Read my Broadband Glossary disclaimer

Next Generation Broadband

April 16, 2007

Next generation broadband refers to sustained, high speed broadband capable of coping with high-bandwidth services such as voice over IP (VoIP), IPTV (tv over the internet), peer-to-peer applications, file sharing, etc.

Currently very fast broadband packages are available in the UK, up to 24 meg. However many people signing up for such services won’t receive the advertised speeds. Therefore two key aspects of next generation broadband are that the high download and upload speeds are sustained; and that they are easily accessible to UK broadband users.

The industry / government forum the Broadband Stakeholder Group (BSG) has recently raised concerns that the financial investment needed to develop existing and new broadband delivery infrastructures could hold back the UK economically if they are not addressed – as sustained high speed broadband access is already the norm in several competitor countries.

By Sarah at UK Broadband Finder
Read my Broadband Glossary disclaimer

Bandwidth

April 14, 2007

Bandwidth is the amount of data that can be transmitted over your broadband connection during a specific time period.

The more bandwith you have available to you, the more data that can be transferred during, say, a second – and the faster your webpages (or anything else you are accessing) will download.

By Sarah at UK Broadband Finder
Read my Broadband Glossary disclaimer